SCOPE OF THE PROBLEM

MS PATIENTS ARE PROGRESSING MORE OFTEN THAN YOU MAY THINK

An estimated 400,000 people are affected by MS in the United States. While 85% of patients are initially diagnosed with RRMS, most of them will eventually transition to SPMS as their disability increases.1,2

WHAT IS SPMS?3

"When an initial relapsing-remitting phase is followed by a progressive phase—defined as an accumulation of disability regardless of relapses, with or without persistence of superimposed relapses—the disease is classified as SPMS."

—Gross, Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, 2017

MOST PATIENTS WITH RRMS WILL PROGRESS TO SPMS4-6

SPMS follows an initial relapsing-remitting course, the most common form of early MS. Many patients with MS will transition regardless of treatment.

Most Patients with RRMS will Progress to SPMS Most Patients with RRMS will Progress to SPMS

*Patients were untreated in natural history studies.6
63 patients were analyzed in a natural history study. These patients progressed after 25 years.6
More than 50% of patients in these studies were treated with an MS treatment.4,5

THE BURDEN OF SPMS

Patients with SPMS are not necessarily wheelchair bound, but their disease burden can become more intense.7

Compared to those with RRMS, these patients have an increased burden, including3

Progressive MS Difficulty Maintaining Employment, Icon

Difficulty maintaining employment due to physical impairments

Progressive MS Disruption of Everyday Activities, Icon

Greater disruption in everyday activities

Progressive MS Hospitalization, Icon

More frequent visits to the hospital

OUR KNOWLEDGE OF SPMS IS STILL EVOLVING

SPMS Knowledge is Evolving, Icon

To date, the bulk of scientific research has focused on RRMS. In recent years, there has been a shift toward researching progressive MS. As our understanding continues to improve, there is a need to illuminate the conversation about SPMS with these patients.

SPMS Knowledge is Evolving, Icon

To date, the bulk of scientific research has focused on RRMS. In recent years, there has been a shift toward researching progressive MS. As our understanding continues to improve, there is a need to illuminate the conversation about SPMS with these patients.

MS=multiple sclerosis; RRMS=relapsing-remitting MS; SPMS=secondary progressive MS.

References: 1. Dilokthornsakul P, Valuck RJ, Nair KV, Corboy JR, Allen RR, Campbell JD. Multiple sclerosis prevalence in the United States commercially insured population. Neurology. 2016;86(11):1014-1021. 2. Types of MS. National Multiple Sclerosis Society website. https://www.nationalmssociety.org/What-is-MS/Types-of-MS. Accessed July 9, 2018. 3. Gross HJ, Watson C. Characteristics, burden of illness, and physical functioning of patients with relapsing-remitting and secondary progressive multiple sclerosis: a cross-sectional US survey. Neuropsychiatr Dis Treat. 2017;13:1349-1357. 4. Leray E, Yaouanq J, Le Page E, et al. Evidence for a two-stage disability progression in multiple sclerosis. Brain. 2010;133(7):1900-1913. 5. Bsteh G, Ehling R, Lutterotti A, et al. Long term clinical prognostic factors in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: insights from a 10-year observational study. PLoS ONE. 2016;11(7): e0158978. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0158978. 6. Weinshenker BG, Bass B, Rice GP, et al. The natural history of multiple sclerosis: a geographically based study. I. clinical course and disability. Brain. 1989;112(Pt 1):133-146. 7. Frequently asked questions about SPMS. National Multiple Sclerosis Society website. https://www.nationalmssociety.org/What-is-MS/Types-of-MS/Secondary-progressive-MS/Frequently-Asked-Questions-about-SPMS. Accessed July 9, 2018.

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